Wireless remote data
Technologies and sample systems that gather sensor data across distances, usually via radio links. This includes general telemetry and SCADA (supervisory control and data acquisition), especially for gathering data about wildlife, natural resources, and distributed energy systems.

Ken Novak's Weblog


daily link  Saturday, September 25, 2004


Wireless Sensors Monitor Volcanic ActivitiesRoland Piquepaille provides a summary of a new sensor net:  "a wireless array of sensors has been deployed to monitor the eruptions of an active volcano in central Ecuador, the Tungurahua. An international team of computer scientists and seismologists installed a small wireless network of five nodes to record 54 hours of continuous infrasound data transmitted over a 9 km wireless link back to a base station at the volcano observatory. As the results are very encouraging, and because these wireless sensors are very cheap, this installation will soon be duplicated to detect eruptions of other active volcanoes. The team expects to deploy larger infrasonic arrays consisting of up to 50 nodes in the next six months either on Tungurahua or elsewhere in the world."  4:50:58 PM  permalink  


daily link  Thursday, September 23, 2004


'Smart Dust' for Monitoring Ready for Sale: Nice intro to new products from Dust, Inc.  About $5000 for a starter kit with 12 motes.  10:19:15 AM  permalink  


daily link  Friday, September 17, 2004


Magic Bike :: Wireless Access Bike: Fun combination of 'art' and tech:  "magicbike is a mobile WiFi (wireless Internet) hotspot that gives free Internet connectivity wherever its ridden or parked. By turning a common bicycle into a wireless hotspot, Magicbike explores new delivery and use strategies for wireless networks and modern-day urbanites. Wireless bicycles disappear into the urban fabric and bring Internet to yet unserved spaces and communities. Mixing public art with techno-activism, Magicbikes are perfect for setting up adhoc Internet connectivity for art and culture events, emergency access, public demonstrations, and communities on the struggling end of the digital-divide."  11:15:31 PM  permalink  

Reddy's PCTVt: "a $250 gizmo that does a whole bunch of things: a computer, a TV, a DVD player, a videophone -- a PCTVt. "I kept asking myself, What would the device have to do for someone on the other side of the digital divide, to be desirable?"wondered Raj Reddy, a professor at Carnegie Mellon University. The answer, he decided, was a simple device that would offer entertainment. This November, Reddy hopes to begin installing the first 100 prototypes of the PCTVt in India and possibly several other countries. Reddy is hoping his project -- with backing from Microsoft and TriGem, the Korean computer maker, and in partnership with the Indian Institute of Science, the Indian Institute of Information Technology and researchers at the University of California, Berkeley -- can prove that it is possible to bring IT to impoverished communities without depending on philanthropy. Because his low-cost computer doubles as a TV and a DVD player, Reddy believes that he will be able to use it as a vehicle to take computing to populations that until now have been excluded. "  10:52:53 PM  permalink  


daily link  Wednesday, September 15, 2004


Low cost email over satellite: Nice analysis of RBGAN costs by Humaninet.  Result is 12-18 cents per average message.  5:27:55 PM  permalink  

Electrovaya - Powerpad:  Laptop extender batteries that fit under the unit and supply power for "up to 12 hours" when fully charged.  $200-500.  5:21:22 PM  permalink  

SunWize Portable Energy System: "The SunWize Portable Energy System converts sunlight into electricity, allowing the user freedom to recharge a handset or other portable device anywhere the sun shines. The system is lightweight, weather-resistant, highly durable, .. UL listed, CE certified and has a system output of 8.5 watts.  Built into the product is the patented SunWize OPTI-Meter LCD metering system that instantly measures sunlight intensity and allows optimum placement of the panel.  The SunWize Portable Energy System is designed for daily field use. The 9.9 watt solar panel is constructed using a proprietary process in which the highest efficiency, single-crystal photovoltaic cells are permanently encased in rugged, weather-resistant urethane plastic. The panelís nine-foot cord winds on a spool recessed into the back of the panel. A hinged metal stand folds flush into the panelís back side. "  Can output a variety of voltages.  Can be combined with a second panel to double output.  Price currently about $360.

Or, on a larger scale, The EN-R-Pak solar-powered portable power generation system, 50w panel bundled with battery to deliver 200w maximum, for about $2200.

  5:17:07 PM  permalink  

Let Your Mobile Do the Pointing: Magnetic sensors make an electronic compass, at low cost.  Added to GPS, you can point at things and get info about them.  9:50:49 AM  permalink  


daily link  Friday, September 10, 2004


Lantronix XPort and WiPort : Tiny interfaces that contain an embedded web server.  Xport converts a serial device to ethernet; WiPort does wifi.  Parts cost $100-150 qty 1 from distribution, developer kits $350.  10:14:48 AM  permalink  

Power Supply Wattage Calculator:  Tool for estimating power requirements for desktop computers.  9:34:00 AM  permalink  


daily link  Wednesday, September 01, 2004


Philly considers wireless Internet for all: "For about $10 million [to install and $1.5m/yr to operate], city officials believe they can turn all 135 square miles of Philadelphia into the world's largest wireless Internet hot spot.  The ambitious plan, now in the works, would involve placing hundreds, or maybe thousands of small transmitters around the city, probably atop lampposts. Each would be capable of communicating with the wireless networking cards that now come standard with many computers. Once complete, the network would deliver broadband Internet almost anywhere radio waves can travel, including poor neighborhoods where high-speed Internet access is now rare. And the city would likely offer the service either for free, or at costs far lower than the $35 to $60 a month charged by commercial providers..  [Similar efforts include:]

  • Chaska, Minn., a suburb of Minneapolis, began offering citywide wireless Internet access this year for $16 a month. The signal covers about 13 square miles.
  • Corpus Christi, Texas, has been experimenting with a system covering 20 square miles that would be used (for now) only by government employees.
  • Over the past year, Cleveland has added some 4,000 wireless transmitters in its University Circle, Midtown and lakefront districts. The service is free, and available to anyone who passes through the areas.  Some 1,016 people were logged in to the system at 2:20 Tuesday afternoon, said Lev Gonick, chief information officer at Case Western Reserve University, which is spearheading the project and paying for a chunk of it. "We like to say it should be like the air you breathe, free and available everywhere," Gonick said. "We look at this like PBS or NPR. It should be a public resource."
  • In New York, city officials are negotiating to sell wireless carriers space on 18,000 lampposts for as much as $21.6 million annually. T-Mobile USA Inc., Nextel Partners Inc., IDT Corp. and three other wireless carriers want the equipment to increase their networks' capacity.

One part of the 15-year deal is cheap Wi-Fi phones for neighborhoods where less than 95 percent of residents have home phones. IDT, which has agreed to market the cheaper phone service in those neighborhoods, would pay lower rates for poles there than other companies would in wealthier areas. .."

  2:11:09 PM  permalink  

Copyright 2005 © Ken Novak.
Last update: 11/24/2005; 11:54:58 PM.
0 page reads.