Updated: 3/22/2007; 10:39:31 PM.

General networking
Data network connectivity developments, networking business news, and related computing items.


daily link  Thursday, March 22, 2007


IDC: Server shipments slow on spread of virtualization:  "Growth in the x86 server market revved slightly in Q4 2006, growing 7.0% in the quarter to $7.2 billion worldwide, its fastest growth rate in five quarters, but unit shipment growth continued to moderate with growth at 1.1% year over year, to 1.85 million servers as customers continued to consolidate their IT infrastructures, .. "For the first time in more than 10 years, average selling values in the quarter increased year over year as IT managers move to consolidate IT workloads. This shift toward a shared compute infrastructure is driving additional scalability, memory attachment and I/O needs, which in turn, lead to higher average selling values." ..

Microsoft Windows servers .. revenue grew 9.4% and unit shipments grew 5.1% year over year. Quarterly revenue of $5.3 billion for Windows servers represented 34.9% of overall quarterly factory revenue, the single largest revenue segment in the server market, IDC reported.

After two consecutive quarters of single-digit revenue growth, Linux server revenue growth accelerated once again, growing 15.3% to $1.8 billion when compared with Q4 2005. Linux servers now represent 11.9% of all server revenue, up more than one point over Q4 2005. But Linux server shipments declined 0.8% year over year after 18 quarters of double-digit shipment growth, as IT consolidation extends its reach into the open source domain...

Unix servers experienced 2.8% revenue growth year over year when compared with Q4 2006. Worldwide Unix revenues were $5.1 billion for the quarter, representing 33.5% of quarterly server spending."  Itanium, z/OS and blades sold about $3.5B combined."
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Introduction to Power Line Communications:  Simple and short intro, mostly about in-home use, with mention of BPL (broadband over power line) utility applications.
  9:15:03 PM  permalink  


daily link  Monday, March 12, 2007


Coltan and Your Mobile:  Disturbing effect of a key electronic material on the ongoing disaster in the Congo.  "Columbite-tantalite (from here on referred to as Coltan). On its own it looks and feels like a very fertile soil, but when refined you get a highly heat-resistant metal powder called tantalum. Once refined, coltan has myriad uses, all of which pertain to its particular properties of being a dense mineral with the ability to withstand high temperatures and stress.To the high-tech industry this tantalum is a magic dust that is essential in making computer chips, stereo’s, VCR and DVD players and mobile phones. As such, coltan derivatives are used as capacitors in devices such as mobile phones and even complex missile guidance systems. ..

Coltan is mined by hand in the Congo by groups of men digging basins in streams by scrapping off the surface mud. They then “slosh” the water around the crater, which causes the Coltan ore to settle to the bottom of the crater where it is retrieved by the miners...

While a fair majority of the worlds tantalum supply comes from legitimate mining operations in Australia, Canada and Brazil the recent demand for tantalum has caused a more sinister market to begin flourishing in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) where 80% of the world’s known coltan supply is subject to “highly organized and systematic exploitation.” There, warring rebel groups - many funded and supplied by neighboring Rwanda and Uganda - are exploiting coltan mining in the Eastern DRC to help finance political and human oppression, child enslavement, torture and war. The mining area is also within one of the main ranges of the threatened Eastern Lowland Gorilla  .. In April of 2001 the United Nations issued a report on the rape of resources from the DRC. In their findings field investigators reported that Rwandan, Ugandan and Burundian rebels had looted and smuggled thousands of tons of coltan from the Congo into their countries to export to the global market, using the profits to finance their militias. ..Coltan smuggling has also been implicated as a major source of income for the military occupation of Congo which is also linked to forced child enlisting, rape and the rampant spread of HIV. ..

Manufacturers rely on their “suppliers” which are Tantalum capacitor makers like Kemet of Greenville, S.C., the world’s largest tantalum capacitor maker and on the companies trading the minerals. .. some 80 percent of the worlds Coltan comes from the DRC and most of that passes through several black market hands before its finally delivered to the refineries it what appears to be legitimate means."
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daily link  Thursday, February 22, 2007


The endowment effect, the 9X problem and collaboration:  Nice summary from HBS.  "the "endowment effect" [is when] we value items in our possession more than prospective items that could be in our possession, especially if the prospective item is a proposed substitute.  We mentally compare having the prospective item to giving up what we already have (our 'endowment'), but because we're loss averse giving up what we already have (our reference point) looms large. 

And Gourville points out three factors that make the situation worse for product developers who want their offerings to succeed.  First is timing:  adopters have to give up their endowment immediately, and only get benefits sometime in the future.  Second, these benefits are not certain; the new product might not work as promised.  Third, benefits are usually qualitative, making them difficult to enumerate and compare. ..

Because of all of the above, Gourville talks about the '9X problem' --  "a mismatch of 9 to 1 between what innovators think consumers want and what consumers actually want."1  The 9X problem goes a long way to explaining the tech industry folk wisdom that to spread like wildfire a new product has to offer a tenfold improvement over  what's currently out there...

Email is a channel technology.  It creates a private conduit between the sender and receiver.  Other parties don't know that the email was sent, and can't consult its contents.   Wikis, del.icio.us, Flickr, Myspace, Facebook, and YouTube, on the other hand, are all platform technologies.  They accumulate content over time and make it visible and accessible to all community members.  [They also foster emergence, where structure emerges rather than being imposed by "groupware" products.] ..  So the new tools are not direct substitutes for email; instead, they're intended to provide capabilities that email can't.  Will they succeed?  It depends  heavily, I believe, on whether companies and their managers want technology platforms for collaboration.  This desire will be an important factor in solving email's 9X problem. "
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daily link  Wednesday, February 14, 2007


On the Reliability of Hard Disks:  Summarizing research papers: "there was no correlation between disk failure rates and utilization, environmental conditions such as temperature, or age. This means that high disk utilization or age of the disk have no significant impact on the probability that it will fail.  .. the expected remaining time until the next disk failure grows with the time it has been since the last failure...

They did find a strong correlation between manufacturer/model and failure rates. They observed that older disks had a much lower failure rates then newer disks, where the newer disks in general were less expensive. Basically you get what you pay when you talk about disk reliability. ..

The only exception to the lack of correlation was that infant mortality rate for disks showed a correlation with high utilization: if a new disk is really crappy you can detect this by putting a high load on it. ..

Both papers report disk failure rates in the 6%-10% range: in a datacenter with about 100,000 disks you will need to replace up to between 6,000 and 10,000 disks per year. "
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daily link  Monday, February 12, 2007


EPEAT: "EPEAT is a system to help purchasers in the public and private sectors evaluate, compare and select desktop computers, notebooks and monitors based on their environmental attributes. EPEAT also provides a clear and consistent set of performance criteria for the design of products.. On January 24, President Bush signed Executive Order 13423 that mandates federal agencies to buy EPEAT registered products."  8:49:16 AM  permalink  


daily link  Sunday, January 14, 2007


Goodbye, 9 and 25 pins: I just unplugged what is probably my last serial connector. After 35 years of dialup and printing at speeds from 75 baud to 115kbps, I no longer own a non-USB serial device. I haven't used an external modem in years, and when my internal laptop modem broke two years ago, I never replaced it. The second-to-last serial device I had was a Palm cradle, also dropped years ago. Today, I finally unplugged an ISDN adaptor I had at home. I had used the ISDN line for fax and an extra phone line, and a last-ditch backup when the cable modem went out. It was easy to keep it around, but the phone charges weren't cheap, and I used it less and less. I got a Sunrocket SIP phone for the fax in December, and once I finally got SBC/ATT to transfer the number to Sunrocket, I cut off the ISDN. Unplugging the ISDN adaptor's 9-to-25 pin cable got me nostalgic, for slower times, for plugging in six cables and three devices and making several dialling attempts to do half of what my cell phone does from my pocket every minute of the day. (This picture was taken by that phone, 'natch).
  3:03:32 PM  permalink  


daily link  Tuesday, November 21, 2006


d y n e : b o l i c -- a free multimedia studio in a GNU/Linux live CD: "You don't need to install anything, you don't even need an harddisk .. Download the ISO-image, burn your own CD, reboot your machine and you'll get back true love ;^)

dyne:bolic is shaped on the needs of media activists, artists and creatives as a practical tool for multimedia production: you can manipulate and broadcast both sound and video with tools to record, edit, encode and stream, having automatically recognized most device and peripherals: audio, video, TV, network cards, firewire, usb and more; all using only free software ..

It is optimized to run on slower computers, turning them into a full media stations: the minimum you need is a pentium1 or k5 PC 64Mb RAM and IDE CD-ROM, or a modded XBOX game console - and if you have more than one, you can easily do clusters.

dyne:bolic is RASTA software released free under the GNU General Public License. This software is about Digital Resistance ina babylon world which tries to control the way we communicate, we share our interests and knowledge." Integrating many multimedia tools, running with minimal system installation, doing automatic clustering for quick render farms: sounds real interesting.
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daily link  Thursday, October 26, 2006


Linksys pocket wireless extender WTR54GS:  Geek heaven: this linksys pocket device looks handy for travellers.  Converts wired hotel access to wireless, for example, or could extend home network.  [Thanks, Scott!]
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daily link  Saturday, September 30, 2006


Windows XP Multiuser Remote Desktop:  With a couple file renames and a registry change, XP can run three remote desktop sessions (normal desktop plus 2 more). 
Combined with the $20-30 terminals that are available from outlets like www.surpluscomputers.com, and the $150-250 LCD screens, you can extend an ordinary PC to multiple users (with very low power and zero noise to boot).
  9:55:29 PM  permalink  


daily link  Friday, September 15, 2006


SSH for Java:  Lots of implementations of SSH clients in Java, under proprietary, GPL, or BSD lisences.
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daily link  Sunday, September 03, 2006


Powerline Ethernet Adapters:  Current (Sept 06) situation appears that residential powerline standard is around 14 mbps, but that different vendors extend it up to 200 mbps max.  Carrying HD signals at 28 mbps is an important threshold, with conventional digital video of 20 mbps also important.  Netgear does well, as does Zyxel.  Both are $100-120 per adaptor.  Linksys has older models at 14 mbps only selling for $65 per adaptor or used down to $30.  Both Linksys and Zyxel have adaptors for USB at about the same price as Ethernet.
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daily link  Friday, August 18, 2006


AllMyData:  Interesting peer-to-peer storage "grid" in which copies of each users's data are encrypted and scattered among many peers for backup.  Service is free if you agree to house 10 GB for every 1 GB you back up.  If you pay a modest fee, you may store data without providing corresponding storage yourself.  It makes sense for many broadband users with excess bandwidth and much empty disk space.  It will be interesting to see if they can make the business model work.
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daily link  Friday, August 04, 2006


Cringely shoots HD:  Details on how he chose digital HD recording and encoding for internet-downloadable TV.  10:52:09 AM  permalink  


daily link  Monday, July 31, 2006


Jyve Pro:  "Everyone's an expert at something .. How to make money by talking on Skype."  Service that integrates billing and directory listing for voice-based services, like translation, coaching, computer help desk, etc.  Via Skype Journal.  I wonder if Nuance's latest, well-reviewed Dragon NaturallySpeaking 9 software could be integrated for some services as well.  (NaturallySpeaking 9 is the first version of any voice recognition program that seems to get good results without having to train the program to each user's voice.)
  1:02:27 AM  permalink  

Hacktivismo releases secure IM for dissidents: "to communicate across oppressive national firewalls, [consider] ScatterChat, a secure IM application developed by an international group of hackers, human rights activists, lawyers and security experts. .. [It] is based on the open source Gain IM client and uses the anonymous Tor network to offer secure end-to-end encryption for both chat and file transfers, the developer group Hacktivisimo said on Friday. Installers for Microsoft Windows, as well as the software's source code, are available now, and packages for Linux and Mac OS X are listed as "coming soon."

It's designed for "nontechnical human rights activists and political dissidents" but could also be also useful for corporate environments and other settings where privacy is important, according to the groups Web site. .. The anonymity and encryption provided by ScatterChat ensures that [obscures] both the identities and messages of users". Good techincal doc on their site.
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daily link  Tuesday, June 20, 2006


Skype Journal: eBay, PayPal, Skype by the Numbers:  Cogent summary of statistics and other info about the three companies today.
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VoSKY: Vendor of Skype-certified extension hardware, including a model for small offices.  Their personal one-line gateway was favorably reviewed in the NYT.  Features:
  • Call skype destinations, including skypeOut, from your usual phone set at home.
  • Call into your home number (for example, from your cell phone) and have skype connect the call through to a skype destination.
  • Forward incoming calls from skype to your cell phone or other PSTN destination.
  • Call return: If a skype destination does not answer, you can get an automatic retry of the call when skype destination returns online.
  • About $60 for the personal edition, $900 for the 4-line gateway.
  • Downside: needs XP computer connected by USB and running to function.
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daily link  Tuesday, March 28, 2006


ENIAC plus 60: Nice series on the very first computers.  " The scientists knew that they had created something that would change history, but they weren't sure how to convey their breakthrough to the public. So they painted numbers on some light bulbs and screwed the resulting "translucent spheres" into ENIAC's panels. Dynamic, flashy lights would thereafter be associated with the computer in the public mind."  12:54:05 PM  permalink  


daily link  Wednesday, February 01, 2006


Jesse Sullivan, the World's First Bionic Man:  Groundbreaking use of nerves to control artificial limbs, so that thought controls the device. Amazing video. May be applications for other machine control.  "In May 2001, working as a high-power lineman 54 year old Jesse Sullivan was electrocuted so severely that both of his arms needed to be amputated. ..

Doctors take nerves that used to go to the arm and move those nerves onto chest muscles. The nerves grow into the chest muscles, so when the patient thinks “close hand,” a portion of his chest muscle contracts and electrodes that detect this muscle activity tell the computerized arm when to close the hand. Thus, the patient thinks “close hand” and his artificial hand closes. ..

While previously moving his artificial arms was slow and cumbersome, today he is able to do many of the routine tasks he took for granted before his accident, including putting on socks, shaving, eating dinner, taking out the garbage, carrying groceries and vacuuming."
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daily link  Monday, January 30, 2006


IM Interoperability matrix: Useful reference to features and connections among AIM, Yahoo, MSN, Google, Skype, and a few others.  11:52:07 PM  permalink  


daily link  Friday, January 27, 2006


My Outsourced Life:  Funny article on individual outsourcing.  I wonder how close to true it is?
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daily link  Wednesday, January 18, 2006


111m surfers in China: "The number of Web users in China, the world's second largest Internet market, grew by 18 percent in 2005 to 111 million, the Economic Daily reported on Wednesday. Some 8.5 percent of the country's 1.3 billion people now had access to the Internet, the newspaper reported, citing a survey released by the China Internet Network Information Center.  .. The 2005 gains represented an acceleration from 2004, when the number of Internet users grew 16 percent to 94 million. More than half of China's Web population -- or about 64 million people -- accessed the Web via broadband connections, suggesting a 50 percent increase versus 2004 as China strongly promotes the development of its broadband networks. ..

China is the world's No. 2 PC market, with nearly 16 million units shipped in 2004 and the number expected to have grown another 13 percent last year, according to data tracking firm International Data Corp."

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daily link  Friday, December 09, 2005


Ogre to Slay? Outsource It to Chinese: "from Seoul to San Francisco, affluent online gamers who lack the time and patience to work their way up to the higher levels of gamedom are willing to pay the young Chinese here to play the early rounds for them. "For 12 hours a day, 7 days a week, my colleagues and I are killing monsters," said a 23-year-old gamer who works here in this makeshift factory and goes by the online code name Wandering. "I make about $250 a month" ..

[There are] hundreds - perhaps thousands - of online gaming factories here in China. By some estimates, there are well over 100,000 young people working in China as full-time gamers .. The Chinese government estimates that there are 24 million online gamers in China, meaning that nearly one in four Internet users here play online games." Good slideshow.

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daily link  Thursday, December 01, 2005


San Diego Night: With cameras that take pictures up to 4000 megapixels, The Gigapixl Project makes amazingly detailed images.  The images expand the scope of "plain sight," and thereby reduce our zone of privacy.  [Thanks, Scott ]  2:27:39 PM  permalink  

Parallel ATA and SATA 1:  A quick comparison.
  8:55:21 AM  permalink  


daily link  Wednesday, November 30, 2005


Mind-machine communication: "Recognizing that many people who have lost the ability to move their limbs due to spinal cord, nerve or muscle damage have intact brains, Donoghue and his colleagues devised a way to translate thoughts into computer commands.  In Cyberkinetics’ BrainGate system, now being tested in two patients, a silicon array the size of a baby aspirin is implanted into the brain’s primary motor cortex, which is responsible for limb movement. The chip--which contains 100 gold electrodes, each thinner than a human hair--is wired to a computer that interprets electrical signals from the neurons, allowing the subject to control a cursor and, by extension, other equipment.

Within two months, the first subject, a 25-year-old who had become paralyzed three years earlier, was able to open e-mail, channel surf on a television and turn lights off and on. By enabling the man to control a computer merely by thinking about it, Donoghue and his team provided him with increased autonomy. .. “Someday, the technology may allow the paralyzed to move their own muscles,” says [fellow Brown professor Roy] Aaron."

  10:09:14 PM  permalink  

Hackers Admit to Wave of Attacks: "An Ohio computer hacker who served as a digital button man for a shady internet hosting company faces prison time after admitting he carried out one of a series of crippling denial-of-service attacks ordered by a wealthy businessman against his competitors. "  Quite a story: Hackers used an Ohio ISP to discover vulnerable windows machines.  One found 15,000, and used spybot to take them over.  A Los Angeles business man hired the ISP manager for $1000 to orchestrate a DoS attack on his competitors.  "The FBI described the ensuing attack as a tenacious, 10-day deluge that tracked RapidSatellite through three ISP changes, and briefly blocked Amazon.com and the website of the Department of Homeland Security, which had the poor luck of sharing service providers with Echouafni's rival. "

The businessman liked the results so much he bought the ISP and went after other targets.  "Jay Echouafni, the 38-year-old satellite TV mogul who allegedly ordered and funded the cyberhits, went on the lam last year, and remains a fugitive from a federal indictment out of Los Angeles. .. Echouafni skipped out on $750,000 bail secured by his house in Massachusetts last year. Law enforcement officials believe he's now living in his native Morocco. " [Via Scott Lemon]

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daily link  Monday, November 21, 2005


Keylogger Threats Rise 65%: " Threats from keyloggers, the stealthily installed programs that record computer keystrokes to help steal personal information, grew 65 percent this year, a study said Tuesday, marking a growing trend in hackers using malware for financial gain.  About 6,191 keyloggers were recorded this year, up from 3,753 in 2004, said iDefense, a security intelligence provider that is part of VeriSign. iDefense recorded 3,753 keyloggers in 2004, a huge leap over the 300 released in 2000."

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daily link  Friday, November 11, 2005


History's Worst Software Bugs: Cool story of software bugs with bad effects.  First, why "bug"?  In 1945, "engineers found a moth in Panel F, Relay #70 of the Harvard Mark II system. The computer was running a test of its multiplier and adder when the engineers noticed something was wrong. The moth was trapped, removed and taped into the computer's logbook with the words: "first actual case of a bug being found."

My favorite story was an intentional bug placed by the CIA in 1982.  The background refs are worth reading.  "Operatives working for the Central Intelligence Agency allegedly (.pdf) plant a bug in a Canadian computer system purchased to control the trans-Siberian gas pipeline. The Soviets had obtained the system as part of a wide-ranging effort to covertly purchase or steal sensitive U.S. technology. The CIA reportedly found out about the program and decided to make it backfire with equipment that would pass Soviet inspection and then fail once in operation. The resulting event is reportedly the largest non-nuclear explosion in the planet's history."

  11:19:26 PM  permalink  

Discover Music - Pandora: Neat service that generates a radio station by picking music that resemble a single artist or song.  Way cool.  An outgrowth of the Music Genome Project: "Over the past 5 years, we've carefully listened to the songs of over 10,000 different artists - ranging from popular to obscure - and analyzed the musical qualities of each song one attribute at a time. This work continues each and every day as we endeavor to include all the great new stuff coming out of studios, clubs and garages around the world."  [Thanks, Scott]  10:57:13 PM  permalink  

NearlyFreeSpeech.NET Web Hosting: Hosting with "long tail" pricing. "no contracts and no commitments .. If you'd like to talk to one of our sales reps to get a quote, you're out of luck. We don't have any. We also don't have any commissions, referral payments, or kickbacks. With NearlyFreeSpeech.NET, your money goes straight to the services you actually use"

  • Data Transfers (Bandwidth):   $1.00 per gigabyte
  • Disk Space (Storage):   $0.01 per megabyte-month
  • DNS at $0.02 per registered domain per day, no matter how active your domain gets.
  • Domain registration at $7.45 for a one-year .com and $7.68 for .net or .org.
  10:47:04 AM  permalink  


daily link  Tuesday, November 08, 2005


New Worm Plupii Targets Linux Web Service Holes: "The three vulnerabilities it attacks through are the XML-RPC for PHP Remote Code Injection vulnerability; the AWStats Rawlog Plugin Logfile Parameter Input Validation Vulnerability; and the Darryl Burgdorf Webhints Remote Command Execution Vulnerability.

When Plupii is successful in infecting a server, it then sends a notification message to an attacker at a remote IP address via UDP port 7222 or 7111.  .. Next, it opens a back door through one or the other of these ports. This enables an attacker to gain unauthorized access to the compromised system. Once in place, Plupii generates a variety of URLs .. in an attempt to find and infect other vulnerable systems.

The worm itself is easy to destroy. One need only delete the file: /tmp/lupii. The more significant problem is what the attacker may have downloaded to the server while it was active.  Indeed, Symantec's Deepsight Alert Services recommends that, "Due to the ability of the remote user to perform so many different actions on the server computer, including installation of applications, it is highly recommended that compromised computers be completely reinstalled." "

  8:11:15 PM  permalink  

Mobile Comms Satellite Launches Into Orbit: Inmarsat bGAN broadband network nearly complete.  "The second step in a $1.5 billion program to create a mobile broadband communications network spanning the globe for users at sea, in the air and on land roared into space today.  .. When [The Inmarsat 4-F2 satellite] enters service from geostationary orbit 22,300 miles (35,888 kilometers) above Earth next year, the craft will join the Inmarsat 4-F1 satellite that was successfully launched on Lockheed Martin's Atlas 5 rocket in March from Cape Canaveral, Florida. Together, the two craft will deliver broadband communications to 85 percent of the world."  Connections are expected at around 400 kbps in each direction.

Also interesting is how it got there.  It was launched SeaLaunch, a private company using a floating platform and Ukranian and Russian rockets.

  8:07:35 PM  permalink  

The Federal Government Isn't Ready for Avian Flu. Are you?  An trade magazine for CIOs asks if corporations should have their own avian flu plans.  Actions to consider:

  • "Work remotely. In a flu pandemic, the fewer people who are physically together, the better. Create a virtual private network or add new employees to it.
  • Demand a plan. Once public health officials have established a plan, communicate it throughout your company.
  • Automate. Online transaction functionality for customers and vendors keeps people isolated.
  • Assess demand for raw materials and supplies in advance. If a supplier is hobbled and transportation networks are down, just-in-time inventory arrangements will falter. "

One BellSouth facility is "planning a mock emergency drill based on a flu pandemic scenario. Lathram's 19-person hazardous-materials team completed a mock emergency event for an anthrax outbreak shortly after the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks in New York and Washington, D.C. He says that team would be ideal to respond to a pandemic flu outbreak.  "We would have them don their protective gear and enter a contaminated area or a quarantined area to do maintenance on our computers and other critical infrastructure," he says. "In that way it would be similar, but that would also be dependent on a healthy hazmat team." "

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daily link  Monday, October 24, 2005


Diary of Disaster: Riding Out Katrina in the Data Center: Interesting stories of how some companies dealt with disaster recovery.   Concludes with a few lessons:

  • "PEOPLE FIRST. The first effort should be focused on locating your employees and ensuring their safety.
  • DISTANCE MATTERS. Put your backup data center in a locale far enough away from your primary center to ensure continuity, but close enough to get employees there.
  • PRIORITIZE YOUR BUSINESS. Focus on the information systems that matter most, such as customer support and manufacturing.
  • EXPECT THE UNEXPECTED. No matter how well documented your business Continuity plan, the disaster is likely to throw you an unexpected curveball. Account for the worst possible scenario."
  10:22:01 AM  permalink  


daily link  Sunday, October 23, 2005


The Year of Rewards: Penestanan 2:  When I travelled in Africa and Asia in the 80s, I shot a lot of slides.  I dreamed then of a digital future where my camera would record sound as well as pictures, and where I could annotate the recordings and beam them out to my friends at home in real time.  Even in 1983 you could see it would come, eventually.  Now, here's a fine example from my friend David Lincoln.  Today he's in Bali, taking a walk with villagers in their rice paddies.  11:44:11 PM  permalink  


daily link  Monday, October 03, 2005


Hurricane Katrina Relief: IT providers like Microsoft, Novell, etc, are providing assistance to businesses recovering from Katrina.  "For businesses, organizations, and institutions whose computing systems were adversely effected by the hurricane, InsynQ and a community of ASP, technology, and software providers are donating various virtual computing solutions to help them transition to recovery. .. "  11:56:01 PM  permalink  

U3 USB Devices Launch at DEMOfall: Sept 2005: "Several device manufacturers on Monday unveiled the first USB drives based upon the U3 standard, a method that enables users to carry, store and launch applications directly from a USB flash drive without installation. The U3 technology was first introduced at CES 2005 in January, supported by a host of software and hardware vendors. However, missing from the list is Microsoft, which has not committed to backing the standard.

In the United States, SanDisk, Kingston, Memorex and Verbatim will be launching smart drives for U3 and several popular applications are announcing software support for the standard. .. Software support includes AOL's Winamp, Cerulean Studios' Trillian, McAfee Antivirus and Skype among others. This support by high profile vendors is helping U3 to gain momentum and spur possible widespread adoption, according to Gartner Senior Analyst Joseph Unsworth. ..

U3 drives will begin to ship from various vendors beginning on October 15 in sizes ranging from 256MB to 2GB. The U3 group also announced it had signed a deal with I-O DATA of Japan to begin producing drives for that market beginning early next year."

  11:41:56 PM  permalink  


daily link  Friday, September 30, 2005


Engadget 1985:  Nostalgia for computing 20 years ago.  11:45:13 PM  permalink  


daily link  Monday, September 26, 2005


Current BPL Internet Service Plenty Fast: An early user of BPL (Broadband over Power Line) Internet service from Current Communications over a local Cincinatti power company, Cinergy.  "To use the service, you get a BPL modem. It looks like a largish wall-wart power plug with some LEDs on it. It has an RJ-45 jack on it to connect to a computer or a router. That's about it.  We opted for the Cadillac level service: 3mbps up, 3mbps down, and a dedicated IP. That runs $49.95 a month, but the price decreases as more people in my neighborhood sign up (my current price with >3 neighbors signed up is a paltry $42.46)"  Measured performance:  3.5 mbps downline, 4.2 mbps uplink (!).  12:58:35 PM  permalink  

Update your Linksys router with Sveasoft's firmware: "In its GPL Code Center, Linksys provides the source code for most of its devices. However, unless you're a programmer, this isn't going to do you much good. What can help you out is what Sveasoft has done with that source code. Based in California, this company has taken Linksys' source code and created new versions for replacing factory firmware. Basically, installing this firmware takes a limited functionality $50 consumer router and adds many of the features of an enterprise router. ..

Sveasoft actually sports three different families of firmware: Sveasoft firmware for Linksys WRT54G and WRT54GS routers, Alchemy firmware that works with a list of routers (which is free and adds a lot of the features listed above), and the aforementioned Talisman firmware."

  12:05:41 PM  permalink  

 
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Copyright 2007 © Ken Novak.
Last update: 3/22/2007; 10:39:31 PM.