Future energy
Renewables, fuel cells, hydrogen, and efficiency

Ken Novak's Weblog


daily link  Wednesday, September 22, 2004


Editors on the Future of Energy: A couple useful facts: "By 2007, there should be 22 hybrid car options in the U.S., and some of these will have the strong hybrid qualities", ie, "able to run around town at speeds of say 35 to 40 mph on  electricity and not go to fuel unless it had to run at higher speeds for a long distance trip."

"In the U.S. now, three units of energy come from [natural] gas for every five from oil."

  8:54:55 AM  permalink  


daily link  Tuesday, September 21, 2004


BBC NEWS on distributed micropower: Nice review of various small-scale technologies.  Interesting figure: "ground source heat pumps extract stored solar energy from the ground to run a home's central heating, and can cost as little as an oil-fired boiler to install. Widely used in the rural US, they produce three or four units of heat for every unit of electricity they use, and can be reversed to provide cooling."  I wonder if new materials for the underground piping can make the energy transfer more efficient, reducing the installation costs of these heat pumps.  9:57:51 AM  permalink  


daily link  Wednesday, September 15, 2004


Nanotechnology improves superconductors: "University of California scientists working at Los Alamos National Laboratory with a researcher from the University of Cambridge have demonstrated a simple and industrially scaleable method for improving the current densities of superconducting coated conductors in magnetic field environments. The discovery has the potential to increase the already impressive carrying capacity of superconducting wires and tapes by as much as 200 to 500 percent in certain uses, like motors and generators ..

Superconducting wires and tapes carry hundreds of times more electrical current than conventional copper wires with little or no electrical resistance. Superconducting technology is poised to bring substantial energy efficiencies to electrical power transmission systems in the United States. Much of the excitement caused by this discovery is due to the fact that the process can be easily and economically incorporated into commercial processing of the superconductors. ..

Dean Peterson, leader of the STC, said, "This is a significant technical advancement because it means we are now beginning to understand how to control defects in these superconducting materials and use them to our advantage. This was the first time we have been able to control the structural defects and in doing so, better engineer the material's structure to optimize performance." .. Scientists discovered that small, nanoscale defects are required to maintain high current densities in superconductors, particularly in the presence of high magnetic fields. "

  12:38:57 AM  permalink  

Self-sustaining robot powered by flies in a fuel cell: "To survive without human help, a robot needs to be able to generate its own energy. So Chris Melhuish and his team of robotics experts at the University of the West of England in Bristol are developing a robot that catches flies and digests them in a special reactor cell that generates electricity. Called EcoBot II, the robot is part of a drive to make "release and forget" robots that can be sent into dangerous or inhospitable areas to carry out remote industrial or military monitoring of, say, temperature or toxic gas concentrations. Sensors on the robot feed a data logger that periodically radios the results back to a base station.

The robot's energy source is the sugar in the polysaccharide called chitin that makes up a fly's exoskeleton. EcoBot II digests the flies in an array of eight microbial fuel cells (MFCs), which use bacteria from sewage to break down the sugars, releasing electrons that drive an electric current.  In its present form, EcoBot II still has to be manually fed fistfuls of dead bluebottles, but the ultimate aim of the UWE robotics team is to make the droid predatory, using sewage as a bait to catch the flies.

.. With a top speed of 10 centimetres per hour, EcoBot II's roving prowess is still modest to say the least. "Every 12 minutes it gets enough energy to take a step forwards two centimetres and send a transmission back," says Melhuish.  But it does not need to catch too many flies to do so, says team member Ioannis Ieropoulos. In tests, EcoBot II travelled for five days on just eight fat flies - one in each MFC.

So how do flies get turned into electricity? Each MFC comprises an anaerobic chamber filled with raw sewage slurry - donated by UWE's local utility, Wessex Water. The flies become food for the bacteria that thrive in the slurry.  Enzymes produced by the bacteria break down the chitin to release sugar molecules. These are then absorbed and metabolised by the bacteria. In the process, the bacteria release electrons that are harnessed to create an electric current."

  12:20:22 AM  permalink  


daily link  Saturday, September 11, 2004


Renewing America's Economy: The Union on Concerned Scientists modelled the results of a national renewable electricity standard (RES) with a gradually increase in US renewable energy from about 2.5 percent today to 20 percent by 2020, with net benefits of $49B in that period.

  4:12:23 PM  permalink  

Energetech: Another wave energy company, based in Australia with one plant there and another planned in Rhode Island.  4:09:14 PM  permalink  

Home
Rationale
Blogroll
Public Bloglines
Technorati Profile
news search
blog search
-
Last update: 11/24/2005; 11:21:40 PM.
0 page reads.