Updated: 5/16/2006; 11:32:38 AM.

Ken Novak's Weblog
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daily link  Friday, February 13, 2004


Activist Ads Dumped from Google: Google "has banned the ads of an environmental group protesting major cruise line Royal Caribbean’s sewage treatment methods, drawing interest to the editorial policies that control the popular Google AdWords program.

Last week, Oceana placed two advertisements with Google, the first describing Oceana’s mission and linking to the organization’s website, http://www.oceana.org, the second focusing on Oceana’s well-known campaign to stop cruise pollution. Google removed the ads after two days, citing the cruise pollution ad for “language that advocates against Royal Caribbean,” and the general ad for using “language advocating against the cruise line industry and cruisers.”  ..

If anything, Oceana has drawn more interest to their cause via today’s news than they normally would buying a limited amount of Google AdWords. When I search for “cruise line” on Google now, the top result shown is a Google News result for this same story in an online newspaper. Perhaps Oceana planned this…. if so GENIUS! If not, well… excellent way to capitalize on the story! "

  11:25:36 PM  permalink  

MPR: Future Tense: 5-minute NPR technology show has a good site with transcripts and recordings of the interviews.  4:29:21 PM  permalink  

Why 802.11 is underhyped: "One clear lesson in the history of technology and business is that once an open standard gains critical mass, it is extremely hard to derail. The x86 computing architecture and the Ethernet networking standard are two salient examples of this truism. Once a single interoperable standard gains the acceptance of multiple vendors in a marketplace, a consumer bias toward compatibility and scale economics create an increasing-returns phenomenon that is nearly unassailable. Open standards obtain a high "stickiness" factor with customers as a result of compatibility. Once customers invest in a standard, they are likely to purchase more and more supporting infrastructure. ..

In five short years, a backwardly compatible 802.11g chip began to offer about 25 times the performance at about one-twentieth the price of the first-generation radios in this market. ..

802.11 will not sit still. Before you know it, the performance gap--especially on a value per dollar basis--will quickly narrow. The x86 processor has doubled its MIPS (million instructions per second) performance every 18 months. Ethernet performance has increased tenfold every three years. The same will happen with open-standard radio, and those that promote the weaknesses of the standard are merely writing the feature list for future innovation on top of the standard. ..

Make no mistake about it: 802.11, or one of its backwardly compatible descendants, will dominate the wireless communications sector over the next 10 years the same way the x86 architecture dominates computing and that Ethernet dominates networking. "

  8:26:01 AM  permalink  

 

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Last update: 5/16/2006; 11:32:38 AM.